The Snoring Spectrum: Snoring Sounding Intensity During Sleep and Clinical Factors

In: Snoring

13 Aug 2014

The Snoring Spectrum: Snoring Sounding Intensity During Sleep and Clinical FactorsSnoring Sounding Intensity During Sleep and Clinical Factors
The clinical information regarding the chief complaint was available for 682 of the study participants (Table 1). Table 4 shows the sound intensity levels for three chief complaint categories: snoring, hypersomnolence, and breathing stoppage. Patients with breathing stoppage had significantly higher snoring sound intensity levels than patients with snoring or hypersomnolence (p < 0.001). Patients with snoring or hypersomnolence had similar Leq, L1, and L5 values (p > 0.283).
A complete clinical history record of the duration of snoring symptoms was available for 245 patients (Table 1). Patients with a recent onset or a snoring duration of only a few years had significantly lower average Leq values than those who had snored for many years, respectively: 45.5 (95% CI, 44.0 to 47.0) vs 48.2 (95% CI, 46.8 to 49.7) dBA (p < 0.02), Similar results were obtained for patients with a positive or negative clinical history of breathing stoppage so purchase antibiotics online. A complete clinical history record of breathing stoppage was available for 305 patients. Patients (n = 31) with a documented absent history of breathing stoppage during sleep had significantly lower average Leq values than those (n = 290) with a known history of breathing stoppage, respectively: 44.3 (95% CI, 41.2 to 47.4) vs 47.7 (95% CI, 46.7 to 48.6) dBA (p = 0.028).
A complete clinical history record of the presence or absence of systemic hypertension was available for 199 patients (Table 1). Patients with a history of systemic hypertension had significantly higher snoring sound intensity levels than did patients without a history of hypertension (Table 7). However, the relationships between hypertension and snoring sound intensity levels were lost after adjusting for effects of gender and obese status (p > 0.251).
Some patients received a visual investigation of the nasal (n = 249) and oropharyngeal (n = 319) regions by their referring physicians. Based on this investigation, patients with “narrow” nasal or oropharyngeal dimensions were put into one group, and patients with “normal” dimensions were put into another group. Patients with a narrow oropharynx had significantly higher Leq, L1, and L5 values than patients with a normal oropharynx. However, there was no statistical difference in snoring sound intensity levels between patients having narrow or normal nasal chambers (Table 8).

Table 7— Sound Intensity Measures and Systemic Hypertension

Sound Intensity Measure Systemic Hypertension p Value
Yes No
Leq, dBA 49.6 (48.0-51.1) 46.9 (45.5-48.3) 0.018
No. of patients 96 103
L1, dBA 60.1 (58.8-61.4) 57.2 (55.8-58.5) 0.005
No. of patients 95 103
L5, dBA 53.3 (52.0-54.6) 51.3 (50.0-52.6) 0.022
No. of patients 94 100
L10, dBA 50.1 (48.8-51.4) 48.6 (47.3-49.9) 0.074
No. of patients 84 93

Table 8—The Relationship Between Snoring Sound Intensity Measures and Anatomical Characteristics of Nasal Chambers and Oropharynx at Visual Inspection

Sound Intensity Measure Nasal Chambers Oropharynx
Narrow  Normal p Value Narrow  Normal p Value
Leq, dBA 48.2 (46.4-50.0) 46.2 (45.0-47.4) 0.103 47.6 (46.6-48.7) 44.9 (43.2-46.7) 0.016
No. of patients 107 142 234 85
L1, dBA 57.8 (56.5-59.2) 57.1 (55.9-58.2) 0.377 57.9 (57.0-58.8) 55.7(54.1-57.3) 0.017
No. of patients 106 142 233 85
L5, dBA 51.9 (50.6-53.2) 51.1 (50.0-52.2) 0.313 51.6 (50.7-52.5) 50.0 (48.4-51.6) 0.058
No. of patients 104 135 228 78
L10, dBA 49.4 (48.1-50.6) 48.3 (47.2-49.4) 0.146 48.8 (48.0-49.7) 47.8 (46.3-49.4) 0.183
No. of patients 96 126 213 68

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